Textiles and furnishings

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Textiles and furnishings

Textiles are produced from a variety of natural or man-made fibres, or a combination of the two, incorporating organic or inorganic materials. Conservators working with textiles have a comprehensive knowledge of fibres, colourants including inks, dyes and pigments and an understanding of design and construction techniques. Textile conservators work with a wide range of materials

Textiles and furnishings2020-08-10T20:54:14+10:00

Audiovisual and digital

Audiovisual conservation encompasses media recorded on motion picture film, magnetic media, audio recording technologies and video. During the 20th and 21st centuries artists began to experiment with film and sound in their art practice, as many contemporary artists do today. As a result, conservators work to preserve this material along with the large collections of

Audiovisual and digital2020-08-10T20:27:52+10:00

Photographs and film

Photographic conservators work with photographic media, including photographic and digital prints, film and negatives. Paper conservators are trained to work with photographic material as both can feature cellulose as a base ingredient. However the range of different types of photographs printed on plastic, glass and metal mean the photographic conservator is highly specialised in their

Photographs and film2020-08-10T20:52:07+10:00

Books and manuscripts

The conservation of books and manuscripts encompasses a wide range of media and materials, including maps, prints, drawings, watercolours, manuscripts or scrolls, graphic documents on parchment or papyrus, archival material, books and mixed media works. Many photographic materials also have paper as a support and feature many of the same types of deterioration, although conservators

Books and manuscripts2020-08-10T20:34:02+10:00

Works on paper

The conservation of works on paper encompasses a wide range of media and materials, including maps, prints, drawings, watercolours, manuscripts or scrolls, graphic documents on parchment or papyrus and archival material. Many photographic materials also have paper as a support and feature many of the same types of deterioration, although conservators often choose to specialise

Works on paper2020-08-10T20:58:27+10:00

Paintings

Paintings are images created by applying coloured mediums to a support. They can be made with a range of pigments combined with oil, acrylic, or natural ochres and applied to a variety of supports including paper, canvas, wood, metal and walls. Paintings consist of multiple layers of different materials, built up from canvas or hard

Paintings2020-08-10T20:50:29+10:00

Archaeological materials

Archaeological materials in Australia are generally uncovered from early colonial occupation sites, marine environments, burial sites or ruins. They can be made from a wide range of inorganic and organic materials including metals, stone, ceramics, bone and skin, wood and plant fibres. In addition, Australia has significant collections of ancient materials from the Stone or

Archaeological materials2020-08-10T20:26:37+10:00

Machinery, clocks and scientific equipment

The conservation of complex machinery, clocks and technical or scientific equipment requires specialist knowledge in the history and usage of such objects. Owners or custodians of these objects must find a balance between demonstrating how these objects were originally used (for example, by replacing their worn parts with replicas) or keeping them as display objects

Machinery, clocks and scientific equipment2020-08-10T20:43:13+10:00

Wood and furniture

As with many objects that were or still are functional, antique furniture and other wooden objects in decorative arts collections within museums or in private hands require special care. Items of furniture are often complex structures that are comprised of different materials each with their own conservation needs. Such materials could include metals, textiles and

Wood and furniture2020-08-10T20:56:05+10:00

Ceramics and glass

The conservation of ceramic and glass includes both functional and decorative objects such as jewellery, sculptures, tiles, mirrors, dolls, and chandeliers. The term ceramics encompasses any type of object that is made out of clay minerals, and can either be fired or un-fired clay. Ceramics are categorised by body type. In general, ceramics fired

Ceramics and glass2020-05-22T10:04:29+10:00
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